Tag Archives: hiking

TGO Challenge – Planning Checklist

I am trying to get organized now that I am in the 2018 TGO Challenge. Here is a brief outline of my planning checklist along with rough schedules:

Hotel reservations – November: COMPLETED!

I wanted to tie down my start and end points quickly and any planned stops along the way as I am sure the smaller hotels and villages may fill up quickly with 400 footsore travelers out there wandering around!

Route planning – November to February: IN THE WORKS

This is where my winter evening fun will be!  I am trying to gather enough information without delving into too many details so there are surprises along the way.

Plane tickets – January to March:

I have started watching prices to get an idea but the real work will be in 2018 so I can get the best price hopefully.

Packing list – January to March:

While I have a general gear list for TGO-like conditions, I will hone it with monthly trips at least in harsher weather.

Training – November to April: IN THE WORKS

This includes monthly 2-4 day trips filled in between with long day hikes with elevation and nightly walks or elliptical.

Local Transport – April:

I want to tie down plans for bus or train routes from the airport to the start well in advance of arriving.  This will include the ferry across Loch Ness if that is my route.

Shipping supplies/equipment – early May:

Call me paranoid, but I am loathe to leave the success of my trip up to the airline baggage system.  I am seriously considering shipping my main gear and supplies over to my first night hotel and doing only a carry-on for the flight over.

I am sure there is something missing from this list, so I will come back and add to it as things progress.  Hope this helps others this year or in the future.

Backpacking and Alcohol

I rarely strap a backpack on for an overnight or longer trip without a flask of my favorite single malt scotch tucked in a side pocket. For this week’s trip, I have decided on The Glenlivet 12 Year.

This is a habit I got into in the 90s and don’t mind the extra weight. Having a daily dram after dinner while watching the stars is a perfect ending to a day in the wilderness.

Some say it’s dangerous to drink in the back country, and I don’t disagree if you over indulge. Excessive alcohol can impair judgement during critical situations and can lower your body temperature and contribute to dehydration. However, a small amount like I enjoy doesn’t seem to make a significant difference even after a long day and in sub freezing temps has not made me noticeably colder (in fact seems to warm me up a bit!). Note that at high altitudes alcohol has a larger effect, so reduce or eliminate it for high mountain trips.

If you are going to carry something to sip on, check out my review of the GSI flask on my Gear Review page and drink responsibly.

Slainte mhath!

Solo Backpacking Safety – Decision Time

A couple of recent trips and non-trips got me thinking about my favorite way to travel in the backcountry – solo – and how that may affect decision making on, or off, the trail.  A couple of examples:

A few weeks ago I went on a trip to Shining Rock Wilderness in western NC while my wife was at a four-day event mid state.  I planned to drop her off on the way and pick up on the way back and have three nights in the woods.  Starting on day two, I began to feel excessively tired and also began to get a constant heart burn.  By night two, it was difficult to eat and I had no energy.  A decade or so ago (I am quickly approaching 50 now), I would have soldiered through and toughed it out.  However, since I was on my own and in a relatively untraveled part of the wilderness, I decided to leave a day early at a slow pace.  Turns out that I was definitely feeling sick and got a little worse, but luckily the heartburn was just that (and coincidental with trying a new dish in the field rather than at home like I usually do).  I don’t regret leaving a day early – better safe than sorry when solo at my age, and I have always promised my lovely wife that I would be careful to ease her worries.

Here we are a few weeks later, and due to bad luck I cancelled a weekend trip to VA to another wilderness area.  I was going to leave on Friday after work and have a short two-night exploration of an area I hadn’t been to in a couple of decades.  Woke up Friday morning feeling awful and stayed home from work.  It was difficult, with my trusty pack already to go and in mid-afternoon feeling a bit better, but I held with the initial decision to postpone a week.  Good decision as I slipped back on Friday night and am still feeling kind of puny on Saturday – not the fitness level you need to tackle several steep climbs and waterless ridges.  The pack is staying by the door ready for next weekend!

I guess the moral of the story is when going solo, and especially as you advance in “experience” (age), playing it safer is probably the best option for you and your significant others.

Hi There!

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My first blog post…hmmm.  I’ll start with what my intentions are:

A blog about hiking, backpacking, and camping from a regular guy with kids and a full time job who has backpacked for 30 years.  Not from an expert, just “experienced” (you can read aging here if you want) enough to know there is a lot to learn yet.

I have no ties to outdoor manufacturers and I buy all my own gear, and generally keep favorites for a long time (not a gear junkie but I appreciate the good stuff as well as good deals).  I’ll post my genuine opinion of my gear under normal circumstances (don’t expect any test results from Everest or a thru hike of the PCT – there are other great sites for that). No extreme adventures or long distance hikes, just your average 2 to 7 day trips with a few longer ones scattered in at times.

And just as important or maybe more so for me, a place to put ideas on “paper” and have respectful discussions and disagreements about those thoughts.  Also a place for questions and comments from novice to seasoned backpackers where the answers will be honest and may include links to more experienced sites or folks when it surpasses my knowledge or comfort level.

Looking forward to the journey!