Backpacking and Alcohol

I rarely strap a backpack on for an overnight or longer trip without a flask of my favorite single malt scotch tucked in a side pocket. For this week’s trip, I have decided on The Glenlivet 12 Year.

This is a habit I got into in the 90s and don’t mind the extra weight. Having a daily dram after dinner while watching the stars is a perfect ending to a day in the wilderness.

Some say it’s dangerous to drink in the back country, and I don’t disagree if you over indulge. Excessive alcohol can impair judgement during critical situations and can lower your body temperature and contribute to dehydration. However, a small amount like I enjoy doesn’t seem to make a significant difference even after a long day and in sub freezing temps has not made me noticeably colder (in fact seems to warm me up a bit!). Note that at high altitudes alcohol has a larger effect, so reduce or eliminate it for high mountain trips.

If you are going to carry something to sip on, check out my review of the GSI flask on my Gear Review page and drink responsibly.

Slainte mhath!

Trip Report from Grayson Highlands on a cold February weekend (finally)!

I just posted a new trip report from last weekend’s excursion to Grayson Highlands in VA and adjacent wilderness areas.  Highlights include:

  • Cold and windy weather with lows near 10 and wind chills to -15
  • Beautiful views and clouds rolling through
  • A lost boy scout
  • An off-trail excursion through thickets and bogs
  • Horses, and more horses

Enjoy!

Low-cost way to reduce backpacking weight

 

So I worked out the other month that my current normal (3-5 day 3.5 season) backpacking kit cost me around $1,000 over the last five to ten years (much of that funding came from selling old gear on Geartrade.com – I am no millionaire!).  That was money well spent for my bad ankle and knees after years of playing soccer.  My base pack weight was near 30 and now is around 15 pounds.  That is about $67 per pound of weight reduction.  A worthy investment to reduce wear and tear on my body, and hopefully extend my backpacking adventures later in life.

Since Dec 1 2016, I have reduced my backpacking weight by another 16 pounds by spending about $100.  That is a much cheaper $6 per pound of reduction!  Notice I say “backpacking” not “backpack” weight…

I bought a Fitbit and dedicated myself, as I approach 50, to get in better shape.  I have dropped 16 pounds so far of middle age spread, and feel better (before photo above and after photo below).  There is a lot of good and bad press about the Fitbit and other health trackers.  Are they extra gadgets that are unnecessary?  Are they accurate at all?  Do they really help get your overall fitness level up?  The answers to these questions in my personal opinion are Maybe, Somewhat, and Depends on the Person.

For me, the Fitbit is exactly what I needed to get focused and increase my stamina, reduce some weight, and generally get healthier.  I was not significantly overweight (around 187 on a 6 ft frame), but didn’t exercise enough due to my natural resources career keeping me very active during the day.  As my job roles have converted over to desk work and meetings while the younger guys have fun in the field, I put on about 10 pounds over a 5 year period without noticing much.  I was in my late 40s and relatively good shape but never established an exercise habit due to the job.

I have attempted several times to get going on the regular exercise routine but always dropped back off with excuses about being busy and replacing workouts with yard work etc.  With the reduced backpack weight, I have been able to go further and see more areas while enjoying the hills more than I used to (especially the downhills on my weak knees getting easier).  Now with training ahead of time I don’t take as long to get my trail legs under me, and I notice the hills on some of my regular routes are a lot smaller!

Why I didn’t do this years ago is a good question.  To make the trail miles easier it seems just common sense to focus on dropping weight on my feet.  I guess it is our focus on cool new gear that distracts from the obvious and less fun moderation of diet and regular exercise. This may be obvious to some, and I knew it intellectually but didn’t apply that knowledge without some prodding.

Fitbits and other devices are not for everyone…they aren’t that accurate on heart rate (they are decent averaging but don’t use them as a medical device) and many other apps can track calorie intake.  But for folks that don’t like to exercise unless it’s fun, this is a great little motivator. The app let’s me track sleep, weight, and exercise without much effort. I also used it for the first two months to track calorie intake until I got comfortable with my eating habits.

I am not trying to pitch yet another device, but suggest that for those like me who naturally don’t have to watch weight and exercise there are still ways to improve your backpacking experience beyond switching out gear and choosing new areas to hike.

A Tent for Wind and Rain

And so it begins again…every few years I end up looking around for a new tent.  Two basic reasons….one, I enjoy tent shopping from scouring detailed reviews and videos on line to putting together a list of my key features and rating each potential tent’s pros and cons (yes I geek out and use Excel spreadsheets for that).  Secondly, there is no such thing as a perfect tent!

I still really like my Lightheart Gear Solong 6. It’s relatively light at 36 ounces (seam sealed but not including stakes), uses trekking poles for support, and is gigantic inside – large enough that my 6 foot frame has ample room and all my gear can go inside as well.  The two doors are a must for me – one entry/exit and one for rainy day operations and cooking.  This is still my go-to tent for most trips in the southeastern US and many other areas.  It’s not the lightest option but really fits my “comfortably light” style of backpacking.

However, this is not the tent I will need for a future trip to Scotland.  Whether I get lucky and am accepted into the TGO Challenge to walk across Scotland in 2018 or if I instead go on a solo trip to the highlands of my birth, I am planning to do a lot of training in the high country treeless areas during wind and rain – the only real way to prep for a Scottish walk!  The Solong 6 is not the tent for this environment although it has held up well to some significant storms.  The awning is great, but it is not enough room for me personally to operate during multiple days of rain.

So here are my thoughts on the new tent for 2017:

  • Mountain Laurel Designs (MLD) Trailstar – this seems like the bomb proof option for Scotland based on many reviews, but it’s only in the top 3 for me right now but hanging in strong due to its unique nature and great reviews.  I will probably go visit Ron at MLD sometime to see a Trailstar in person. The livable space is unbeatable, but I have concerns that the low pitch and crawling in and out won’t be great for my lower back issues.
  • Pyramid Tent – either the MLD Duomid or another similar tent from other manufacturers.  I have looked through several of these but none seem quite to fit my tastes.  Lots of really interesting options, but several top contenders were dropped due to issues like no really good shelter area for rainy day cooking or (like the Duomid) a requirement for a pole extension to reach the right height for me.
  • Tarptent Scarp 1 – after an initial infatuation with Trailstars, I moved over to the Scarp as my number one choice (it is now second or maybe tied for second with the beautiful Trailstar).  This is another bomb-proof option that can be seen in many blogs, videos, and photos of Scottish hiking.  I really liked this one and it seemed to fill the gap of Hilleberg without the price tag of those fantastic tents.  It weighs 52 ounces though, and that is tough to swallow for a longer trip.  On top of that it is a lot smaller than the Trailstar or the Scarp’s cousin the…
  • Tarptent Stratospire 1 – this is my current favorite option, but the real details have yet to be analyzed.  It seems to bridge the gap of relatively light weight (36 ounces) compared to the Scarp and close to that tents windproof ability.  The key to my interest is the vast amount of room – 48 inches height inside, ample inner netted living space, and two large sheltered vestibules with two doors.

So right now as we round the third turn, the Stratospire 1 is in the lead.  I can see myself living out of it through multiple wet and dreary days, and on the sunny day(s) I can have both doors wide open for the views that I really enjoy.   I’ll update once a final decision has been made but there is still work to be done on all the details, and a couple of tent manufacturers to talk to….always fun and educational as these guys know what they are talking about (and have my dream job)!

ULA Ohm 2.0 Review & Uwharrie National Recreational Trail Report

I just posted a review on Trailspace (and updated my Gear Review page) of the ULA Ohm 2.0 after a year of solid testing.  I really appreciate this pack for its light weight, versatility, and ease of access that it provides.  Only downside is the typical sweaty back syndrome common to many packs.  Highly recommend the Ohm and it has taken its place as my number one pack on trips up to 5+ days.

Another update can be found on my Trip Report page – a description and bunch of photos of a wet weekend trip along half of the Uwharrie National Recreational Trail.

Here ends January 2017, and looking forward to some winter hiking in February after a mild start to the year!

 

Out There: A Voice from the Wild – Chris Townsend

One of my Christmas goodies this year was Chris Townsend’s new book – Out There: A Voice from the Wild.  I just finished it, appropriately, on a couple of rainy evenings in my tent on a backpacking trip.  I am not sure there is a better way to read a good book than with the sound of rain on the tent.

If you love reading outdoor writers, in the realm of Colin Fletcher – my first introduction to the genre decades ago, then Chris Townsend should definitely be on your list.  Out There is a collection of writings that covers his long distance trips, notable backpacking wilderness experiences, his favorite outdoor writers (similar list to mine which is probably why I enjoy his writing), and other topics.  I can already tell I will be coming back to read this again and again over the years, as I do with several other favorites (e.g. Fletcher’s A Thousand Mile Summer).

I enjoyed the entire book, but his discussions of several different backpacking trips including High Sierra wilderness and the TGO Challenge stand out for me personally.  I also can feel the love of wilderness in his writing and much of his approach, including appreciation for the camping aspect as much as the hiking, is similar to mine.  I think it is this similarity that enhances my enjoyment of his writings, and results in me tending to weight his opinions on some equipment higher than others (don’t expect equipment to be a focus – this is not a how to guide to backpacking).

If you are not familiar with Chris and his writing, you might have seen The Backpacker’s Handbook (I think in the fourth edition now).  His website has a full list of books including some older ones on long distance walks through recent publications.  I highly recommend Grizzly Bears and Razor Clams as well as Out There.  I have read several others and am planning on reading many more as I feel Chris is doing the best current job of filling Colin Fletcher’s shoes (or boots?).

UCO Sweetfire Strikeable Fire Starter Review

Another Trailspace Review Corps test has been uploaded to that site for the UCO Sweetfire Strikeable Fire Starter.  This was an interesting one and I struggled with the rating a bit.  It attempts to be a match and a fire starter/tinder and does pretty well with both, but as usual when you do too much you can’t do everything as well.

Vargo Ultimate Fire Starter Review

I completed my first review for the Trailspace Review Corps last week.  The Vargo Ultimate Fire Starter is a neat little device that any wood stove or campfire enthusiast might find interesting. It combines the function of a fire steel/spark lighter with the addition of an extendable bellows to help stoke the fire.  I find it really helpful tinkering with my Calder Ti Tri wood stove.

Please go to Trailspace for the full review.

Mammoth Cave Backpacking Trip and Gear Reviews

I just added a trip report from a quick overnight gear test in Mammoth Cave National Park.  In addition, there are three new gear reviews on that page (Bushnell folding binoculars and Smoked Three Bean Chili and Thai Curry from Good To-Go).  Stay tuned…I have a busy holiday planned with another trip report and several more gear reviews!

Backpacking reviews, trips, and random thoughts